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Mobile Speed Camera Warning Signs In NSW May Be Scrapped

In a move that would help raise potentially millions in revenue, the NSW auditor general believes that mobile speed camera warning signs should be ditched so more drivers on our states roads end up being fined.

A report by NSW Auditor-General Margaret Crawford revealed that in Victoria “covert and unconcealed” mobile speed cameras (MSCs) caught more motorists.

Ms Crawford wrote:

“The number of infringements issued by MSCs in these jurisdictions is many times higher,”

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However, Roads Minister Melinda Pavey’s office has rejected any suggestion that the government will set up more cameras or stop using the speed camera 250m-ahead warning signs.

A spokesman for the minister said:

“It’s not going to happen, it’s not our policy,”

“We’re not going to start pulling down signs like they do in Victoria.”

Ms Crawford’s report revealed that fewer than 0.1 per cent of drivers who passed a camera was fined and there is “limited evidence” speed cameras will lead to any behavioural change in drivers.

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However there was evidence of a drop in fatal and serious crashes at the 30 best-performing mobile speed camera­ locations.

The cameras were first introduced back in 2010, and in 2012 the government said they would be extended to around 2500 locations.

The mobile speed camera program was expanded in 2014, from 930 hours of enforcement per month to 7000 hours.

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There are now more than 1000 sites approved on the basis of crash history and safety but just 650 were being used in the six months to December­ 2017.

One site was used 1768 times in the five years since the government commitment to roll out more locations.

“The limited number of approved­ locations impedes the program’s ability to randomise­ visits and increases the likelihood that enforcement will become predictable,” the report said.

The state has had an overall reduction in serious­ road injuries but the number of fatalities­ involving speed soared by 19 per cent in the 12 months to April. Speed contributed to 40 per cent of fatal crashes in NSW.

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